Author Archives: glennaalbrecht

About glennaalbrecht

Contact at: Farmosopher at Wallaby Farm, NSW: Glenn Albrecht retired as professor of sustainability at Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia in June 2014. He is now an Honorary Fellow in the School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney. He was at the University of Newcastle as Associate Professor of Environmental Studies until December 2008. He is an environmental philosopher with both theoretical and applied interests in the relationship between ecosystem and human health, broadly defined. He has pioneered the research domain of 'psychoterratic' or earth related mental health and emotional conditions with his concept of 'solastalgia' or the lived experience of negative environmental change. Solastalgia has become accepted worldwide as a key concept in understanding the impact of environmental change in academic, creative arts, social impact assessment and legal contexts. Glenn Albrecht’s work is now being used extensively in course readings, new research theses and academic research in many disciplines including geography, philosophy and environmental studies. His work is also being published in languages other than English. He has publications in the field of animal ethics and has published on the ethics of relocating endangered species in the face of climate change pressures and the ethics of the thoroughbred horse industry worldwide With colleagues, Nick Higginbotham (University of Newcastle) and Linda Connor (Sydney University) under Australian Research Council Discovery Project grants, he has researched the psycho-cultural impact of mining in the Upper Hunter Region of NSW, Australia and the impact of climate change on communities, again in the Hunter Region. He has researched the social impact of gas fracking and coal mining on people and communities in the Gloucester region of NSW. Glenn has also been involved as a Chief Investigator in an ARC Discovery Grant Project on the social and ethical aspects of the thoroughbred horse industry worldwide and was a partner investigator on ARC Linkage Grant funded research on the ethics of feral buffalo control in Arnhem Land. He has held an NCCARF grant at Murdoch University which studied the likely impact of climate change on water provision in two inland cities (Broken Hill and Kalgoorlie). Glenn Albrecht is also a pioneer of transdisciplinary thinking and, with Higginbotham and Connor, produced a major book on this topic, Health Social Science: A Transdisciplinary and Complexity Perspective with Oxford University Press in 2001. His current major transdisciplinary research interest, the positive and negative psychological, emotional and cultural relationships people have to place and its transformation is one that sees him having a national and international research profile in an emergent field of academic inquiry where he has been recognised as a global pioneer. International citations to his academic productions are increasing annually and references to his psychoterratic concepts (particularly solastalgia) in global philosophical discussion, art and culture are now too extensive to fully document. New concepts such as his idea of ‘The Symbiocene’ are also attracting international interest. Glenn now works as a ‘farmosopher’ on Wallaby Farm in the Hunter Region of NSW. He continues to research and publish in his chosen fields. He is currently writing a book, Earth Emotions, an overview of his scholarly and public contributions to solastalgia, other psychoterratic issues and the Symbiocene.

Sumbiography (from the Greek, sumbios living together)

I define sumbiography as the sum total of the seminal events and influences on a person’s life that constitute their outlook and values on the importance of life, nature, the environment and life-support systems. A sumbiocentric person is likely to have … Continue reading

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Symbiocene Principles

In what I hope will be a relatively short period of time (perhaps decades), there will be a point in human social development where almost every element of human culture, habitat and technology will be seamlessly re-integrated back into life … Continue reading

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Generation Symbiocene

The generations produced by the Boomers are labelled as vague, directionless tribes in the Anthropocene, but now is their time in history to unite and fight for a cause that is without peer … themselves and their own future. The … Continue reading

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Communication in the Symbiocene

The many positive attributes of Generation Symbiocene, centred on high levels of education and technological sophistication, enable them to communicate with each and every Symbiocene inspired movement worldwide. Similar communications systems to the ones now being used in Western contexts … Continue reading

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Androgynous Symbiotic Intelligence in The Symbiocene

It will not be easy to exit our current era, the Anthropocene, and enter the next era, the Symbiocene. The stakes are so high that to actively engage in symbiotic and peaceful co-existence with other humans and non-human beings has … Continue reading

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Sea Level Rise in Newcastle NSW, Australia.

Teenagers in the recent murderous shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High school in Florida USA have quite rightly publicly resisted the ongoing threat of murder and mayhem at the hand of insane shooters with high powered automatic weapons. Mass murder … Continue reading

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  A positive feeling of oneness with the earth and its life forces where the boundaries between self and the rest of nature are obliterated and a deep sense of peace and connectedness pervades consciousness. (eu =good, tierra = earth, … Continue reading

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