Sumbiology: The ‘Sum’ of Everything

I think we need a new ‘discipline’. One that takes into account the way the world actually works. I call this new discipline Sumbiology (from the Greek sumbios = living together, ology = a branch of learning and knowledge). Sumbiology is the study of humans ‘living together’ with the totality of life. Sumbiologists study life-supporting … Continue reading Sumbiology: The ‘Sum’ of Everything

Children in The Symbiocene

Many young men and women of childbearing age ask if it is reasonable to have children with a such bleak future unfolding via climate calescence, ecosystem distress, nuclear fallout, plastic pollution, species extinction and a myriad of other Earth insults. My answer is that if we do nothing to bring about the end of the … Continue reading Children in The Symbiocene

Alcoalism

Alcoalism: a serious addiction afflicting politicians who cannot give up political donations from coal companies. Remedy: Alcoalholics Anonymous: "is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoalism. The only requirement for membership is a … Continue reading Alcoalism

Sumbiocriticism

A form of social, cultural and literary criticism that evaluates all forms of creative endeavour from the perspective of: The degree of interconnectedness between the social world and the biological and ecological systems that support it The level of awareness of the forms symbiotic 'living together' between different types of beings on this planet The ability … Continue reading Sumbiocriticism

Cognalgia

Cognalgia = pain or distress in the mind caused by conceptual overload or the complete disruption of all previous forms of cognition-as-usual. From Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn and algia = pain.

Mermerosity and The New Mourning

I suggest that the ‘new mourning’ contains the emergent elements of detailed knowledge of causality, anthropogenic culpability and enhanced empathy for the non-human (Albrecht 2016-7). The etymological origins of the word ‘mourning’ come from the Greek language, mermeros related to ‘a state of being worried’ and its meaning is associated with being troubled and to … Continue reading Mermerosity and The New Mourning